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movie reviewThe Ghazi Attack

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Critic's Rating:

Star Cast:

Atul Kulkarni, Kay Kay Menon, Rana Daggubati, Taapsee Pannu

Story

The Ghazi Attack (Ghazi in Telugu) is an upcoming Indian war film directed by debutant Sankalp. The film is based on mysterious sinking of PNS Ghazi during Indo-Pakistani War of 1971. The film stars Rana Daggubati, Taapsee Pannu, Kay Kay Menon and Atul Kulkarni. Amitabh Bachchan lent his voice for the Hindi version of the film It is India's first underwater/war-at-sea film.

Movie Review

 Border stops being the benchmark. The Ghazi Attack is now the best Indian war film, ladies and gents.

 
Stripped of all the saturated fats that we associate with Indian war films (courtesy JP Dutta) such as sentimental backstories of soldiers, romantic subplots that only serve to bore and unrealistic heroism, The Ghazi Attack, helmed by first-time filmmaker Sankalp Reddy, deserves kudos for its smart, smart filmmaking.
 
At the centre of the story lies the mysterious sinking of Pakistani submarine PNS Ghazi during the 1971 war. The film projects it as an INS Rajput vs PNS Ghazi submarine battle — which is disputed — and calls it an Indo-Pak war you don’t know about.
 
There are stories within stories, and so there is the aggressive Capt Singh, the pragmatic officer Arjun (an impressive Rana Daggubati), Singh’s loyal second-in-command Devaraj (Atul Kulkarni) and two measly Bangladeshi refugees (including Taapsee Pannu) plucked from the sea by the brave Arjun himself.
 
While Singh and Arjun are playing out their power games, with Singh repeatedly mocking Arjun and his “political masters (including Om Puri, as the head of the Eastern Naval Command)”, PNS Ghazi is quietly making its way to the Bay of Bengal. The Navy gets a clue about Pakistan’s designs, and sends in S-21 (INS Rajput) submarine to “just keep a watch”. Which Singh — toting ‘War As I Knew It’ by American General George S Patton — dismisses as stupid, for brave soldiers must attack on sight.
 
Shot splendidly inside what looks like a real submarine, Ghazi has been mounted with a fair degree of authenticity and scripted quite impressively. Admittedly, the film may not be comparable to some of Hollywood’s unforgettable war classics, like Von Ryan’s Express and Battle of the Bulge – just to name two. But given the kind of handicaps Indian cinema faces in terms of budget and special effects, Ghazi is remarkable in the way it presents some of the tensest moments when the Indian submarine hits a landmine planted by the Pakistani vessel.
 
While the visuals and special effects lack finesse, the film compensates for it with its riveting story. The second half keeps you on the edge of your seat as the submarines go head-to-head, firing torpedoes while dodging and defending themselves. Despite the hitches, this underwater thriller is worth a watch. It leaves you in awe of the soldiers, who lay their lives for their country.